Lecture Programme


Lectures at the Lit & Phil

These talks are organised by the Lit & Phil (you don't need to be a member in order to attend any of their public events), and tickets cost £4 per talk, from the Lit & Phil Library, 23 Westgate Road, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 1SE, in person or over the phone (0191) 232 0192. It is advisable to book seats in advance; if you reserve a ticket and are subsequently unable to attend, please let us know as we often have a waiting list.

Meanwhile, Gail-Nina continues her series of triads of art lectures on linked topics with three talks on women artists, all on Mondays in June, all starting at 6pm. They can be enjoyed separately - you don't have to book for all three.

Women Artists

Monday, June 4th: The Changing role of Women Artists in 18th Century Europe
This was the period when changing attitudes to art education and the social role of the artist allowed the female practitioner to emerge as an independent professional, with the possibility of a career that brought her into contact with the highest pinnacles of society.
Rosalba Carriera in Venice, Madame Vigée Le Brun and Adélaïde Labille-Guiard in France and Angelica Kauffmann in England all excelled in the sort of stylish imagery that helped make female artists fashionable.
Monday, June 11th: Women artists in 19th Century France
This was the period when changing attitudes to art education and the social role of the artist allowed the female practitioner to emerge as an independent professional, with the possibility of a career that brought her into contact with the highest pinnacles of society.
France in the 19th century saw a new wave of opportunities for the female artist, within both established styles and also such avant-garde innovations as Impressionism.
Rosa Bonheur, Marie Bracquemond, Eva Gonzalès, Berthe Morisot and the American Mary Cassatt all produced and exhibited work that challenged the expectations of what a woman might achieve, exploring new techniques (including print-making), styles and innovative influences.
Monday, June 18th: Women Artists in Victorian Britain
Throughout the 19th century the Royal Academy failed to elect a single woman to full membership, but this did not stop them making their presence felt in the professional world of art production, exhibition and training.
More than just genteel accomplishments (Queen Victoria's daughter Louise was an accomplished sculptor), artistic skills became increasingly available via classes and colleges, allowing female artists to became emancipated from limiting stereotypes. The Pre-Raphaelite circle included the idiosyncratic Symbolist Evelyn de Morgan, Elizabeth Forbes absorbed the influence of French Realism and Lady Butler established herself as the finest military painter of the period.

The seeds had been planted for experimentation, Modernism and a Bohemian lifestyle even for the ladies, but that must all wait for a follow-on series of talks to be given in the future!